Many older adults now defer their retirement, working well past what was once considered retirement age. This change is attributed to a number of factors, including good health and a desire to stay engaged, but resoundingly the primary motivation is financial security. However, many older adults are pushed out of the job market for reasons such as ageism, compensation, and the culling of middle management roles. When older adults do find themselves out of work, it becomes increasingly difficult to be hired again. In turn, getting to retirement age no longer means “not working” but rather redesigning this phase of life.
Older adults possess a wealth of wisdom, knowledge, and skills acquired over a lifetime, yet despite their qualifications and rich experience, many struggle to find meaningful work that appropriately compensates them for their value. Those searching for new opportunities often find they must accept a reduction in pay or volunteer their expertise in order to meaningfully and productively use their time. We’ve heard that while older adults appreciate the sense of purpose work can offer, they often feel exploited and undervalued when not compensated for their worth. Older adults are a largely untapped market of tremendous talent, and want to be valued for their unique intelligence and insight.

We’ve heard that while older adults appreciate the sense of purpose work can offer, they often feel exploited
and undervalued when not compensated for their worth.

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